Eight bridges connect the San Francisco Bay, so it is an apt name for a gallery platform that brings the Bay Area art world together.

Our mission is to maintain a vibrant gallery scene, despite restrictions on travel, celebrations and other larger gatherings. We want to support our artists by informing and entertaining curators, collectors and critics with potent online exhibitions of their work.

On the first Thursday of every month, we will launch 8 shows of artists relevant to the Bay Area. They may be working in this place, long considered an epicenter of change, or deeply engaged in the conversations the Bay Area holds dear, whether it’s related to technology, the environment, social justice or sexual identity, to name a few. In addition, each month will highlight the crucial work of a Bay Area non-profit arts organization as its beneficiary, with an initial donation led by Phillips.

Founding Committee

Claudia Altman-Siegel, Kelly Huang, Sophia Kinell, Micki Meng, Daphne Palmer, Chris Perez, Sarah Wendell Sherrill, Jessica Silverman, and Elizabeth Sullivan

Ambassador Committee

Sayre Batton & Maja Thomas, Joachim & Nancy Bechtle, Matt Bernstein, Sabrina Buell, Wayee Chu & Ethan Beard, Natasha Boas, Douglas Durkin, Carla Emil, Matt & Jessica Farron, Lauren Ford, Ali Gass, Stanlee Gatti, Brook Hartzell & Tad Freese, Pamela & David Hornik, Katie & Matt Paige, Putter Pence, Becca Prowda & Daniel Lurie, Deborah Rappaport, Komal Shah & Gaurav Garg, Laura Sweeney, The Battery, Robin Wright, Sonya Yu & Zack Lara

Sponsors

Lobus, Phillips, The Space Program

Available to view in person
RESET
Altman Siegel
Shinpei Kusanagi
New Works

Shinpei Kusanagi is a Japanese painter working in Tokyo. Utilizing a technique reminiscent of traditional Japanese nijimi, Kusanagi stains untreated canvas with layers of translucent color. Incorporating improvisational brushstrokes in vivid hues, the compositions hover on the surface and then recede into deep space. Kusanagi’s uninhibited use of color offers oscillating contrast and harmony, resulting in abstracted landscapes that appear simultaneously dynamic and serene.

Kusanagi’s landscapes evoke familiar urban and natural scenes, such as sidewalks, windows, trees, foliage, and flowers, clouds and the sea. Yet, they simultaneously make viewers imagine an unknown “elsewhere” that expands outside our world. His atmospheric washes of color leave the paintings devoid of specific detail, conjuring memories of time and place rather than a precise representation.

Shinpei Kusanagi (b.1973) lives and works in Tokyo, Japan. Solo exhibitions include: Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo; Altman Siegel, San Francisco; Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery; Gallery Sora, Tokyo; Bankart Studio, Tokyo and Makii Masaru Fine Arts, Tokyo. Group exhibitions include: Carnegie Art Museum, Oxnard; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago; XYZ collective, Tokyo; The Ueno Royal Museum,Tokyo; Gallery Space Prism, Tokyo and Creation Gallery G8, Tokyo.

Altman Siegel
Yamahada Rhapsody, 2021
Acrylic on canvas
23 7/8 x 19 3/4 inches
$6,000
Altman Siegel
SAUNA, 2021
Acrylic on canvas
23 7/8 x 19 3/4 inches
$6,000
Altman Siegel
PRAY, 2021
Acrylic on canvas
23 7/8 x 19 3/4 inches
$6,000
Altman Siegel
We Do Forget Anyway, 2021
Acrylic on canvas
23 7/8 x 19 3/4 inches
$6,000
Altman Siegel
EBB, 2021
Acrylic on canvas
28 5/8 x 28 5/8 inches
$7,000
Altman Siegel
Dark Clouds, 2021
Acrylic on canvas
28 3/8 x 39 3/8 inches
$8,000
Altman Siegel
The Ally, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
71 5/8 x 89 1/2 inches
$22,000
Altman Siegel
Clear Voice, 2021
Acrylic on canvas
63 3/4 x 51 1/8 inches
$12,000
Anthony Meier Fine Arts
Joseph Havel: Works on Paper

 

Anthony Meier Fine Arts is pleased to present a selection of works on paper by Joseph Havel for the June 2021 edition of 8-bridges. Havel employs light and dark in his abstract drawings. Known primarily for his bronze sculptures of boxes, spheres and draped textiles, Havel has transposed his sculptural gestures onto paper using graphite and oil pigment. The artist lives and works in San Francisco and Houston, and currently serves as the Director of the Glassell School of Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Anthony Meier Fine Arts

Weather Sphere I, 2012-2014
Graphite, oil paint and oil stick on paper
43 x 44 inches

SOLD
Anthony Meier Fine Arts

How to Draw a Circle II, 2014
Graphite and oil paint on paper
30 x 23 inches

SOLD
Anthony Meier Fine Arts

Untitled (diptych 2), 2020
Powdered graphite, oil stick, pencil
Diptych
32 1/2 x 24 7/8 inches, each

SOLD
Anthony Meier Fine Arts

First Flowers (S.F.) 3, 2017
Graphite and oil paint on paper
30 x 23 inches
76.2 x 58.4 cm
$8,500

Anthony Meier Fine Arts

First Flowers (S.F.) 10, 2017
Graphite and oil paint on paper
30 x 23 inches
76.2 x 58.4 cm
$8,500

Anthony Meier Fine Arts

Collaborative 1, 2020
Oil stick on paper
Diptych
16 x 13 inches, each
$8,500

Anthony Meier Fine Arts

How to Draw a Circle IV, 2014
Graphite and oil paint on paper
30 x 23 inches

SOLD
Anthony Meier Fine Arts

Weather Sphere II, 2012-2014
Graphite, oil paint and oil stick on paper
43 x 44 inches
$12,500

Jessica Silverman
We Are Here

Jessica Silverman is pleased to announce a curated selection from our inaugural exhibition at 621 Grant Avenue in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Titled “We Are Here,” the group show features paintings, sculptures and photographs.

Jessica Silverman

Luke Butler
A Color Picture II, 2021
Acrylic and acrylic gouache on canvas
44 x 60 inches
$30,000

Jessica Silverman

Margo Wolowiec
Exit Plan, 2021
Handwoven polymer, linen, dye sublimation ink, acrylic paint, deadstock organic cotton, reflective mylar from emergency preparedness kits, mounted on linen support
60 x 62 inches
$35,000

Jessica Silverman

Hayal Pozanti
The Substance of Things Hoped For (2423 – BANO), 2021
Oil and oil stick on linen
60 x 75 inches
$24,000

Jessica Silverman

Julian Hoeber
Curtain Wall Vector Model Variation 01, 2021
Plywood, string, nails, epoxy, acrylic, and vinyl paint
20 x 40 x 6 inches
$15,000

Jessica Silverman

Matt Lipps
All in: Jack of Diamonds, 2021
Archival pigment print
72 x 47 inches
Edition of 5 + 2 AP
$22,000

Jessica Silverman

Dashiell Manley
around some mornings, 2021
Oil on linen
60 x 48 inches
$34,000

Jessica Silverman

Glendalys Medina
The Owl (El Búho), 2021
Nails, oil pastel, paint, marker, and thread on wood
84 x 20 inches
$32,000

Jessica Silverman

Nicole Wermers
Kusine, 2021
Painted steel and concrete
Overall height: 106 inches
Base width and depth: 17 3/4 x 17 3/4 inches
£24,000

CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Tales of Metamorphosis: Rebekah Goldstein, James Perkins, and Amy Nathan

“We tell ourselves stories in order to live.”  – Joan Didion

At the intersection of Rebekah Goldstein, James Perkins and Amy Nathan’s works is a desire to share stories about change. Each artist utilizes formal investigations as a way to share a narrative endowed from personal experience with a focus on transformation. Goldstein alludes to movements, memories and changes that took place in her body during pregnancy through the contours of her canvas, which escape the rectangular. While her paintings still retain a certain flatness, the unconventional shapes relate to the metaphorical journey of human-life, which is far from uniform. 

Perspective and composition guide the narrative in Amy Nathan’s artworks, which reinterpret historical documents of ancient Greek and Roman mythologies to re-examine mythology from a feminist perspective. In these three drawings of photographs of ancient sculptures, Nathan considers how we acquire knowledge—the many filters, perspectives, and informed guesses that are part of any object’s narrative arc through time. By cropping source images to focus on certain details of warriors and goddesses, Nathan highlights the delicate moments, and the tools women use (literally and metaphorically) to hold themselves together. In the drawing, Athena wears Medusa, the goddess is portrayed wearing on her armor a brooch of Medusa. Medusa—whose head was used as a weapon in her own mythology— becomes a mediating talisman itself, an interface of public and private.

James Perkins creates paintings through performative installations that employ the elements and forces of nature to mark time on stretched silks and linens. Made on the beach in Fire Island, New York, Perkins’ work explores the beauty and experience of weathering the vicissitudes of life. The “post-totem structures” start outdoors in the language of sculpture and culminate as “nonsite” wall reliefs with marks made in collaboration with nature. He believes that we all navigate totems and their historical and contemporary values to paint an identity either closer to or further away from his idea of a neutral existence.  

For more information contact the gallery at info@cultexhibitions.com .

CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Amy Nathan
Mars Statuette, 2021
Colored pencil and flashe on paper mounted to board
18 x 12 inches
$3,100
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Rebekah Goldstein
My Reflection in the Water, 2021
Acrylic and oil on shaped canvas
66.5 x 48 inches
$18,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
James Perkins
Event Horizon Pink Triangle Fire Island, New York, 2019
Silk, sun, sand, wind, wood, water, aluminum
29 x 3 x 110 inches
$25,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Amy Nathan
Athena Wears Medusa, 2020
Colored pencil and flashe on paper
12.5 x 10 inches
$1,500
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Rebekah Goldstein
Sorry Not Sorry, 2021
Acrylic and oil on shaped canvas
70.5 x 58 inches
$22,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
James Perkins
A Line in Nature Fire Island, New York, 2019
Silk, sun, sand, wind, wood, water, aluminum
37 x 95 x 3 inches
$20,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Rebekah Goldstein
One Hand in my Pocket, 2021
Acrylic and oil on shaped canvas
60 x 56 inches
$19,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Amy Nathan
Crouching Mars, 2021
Colored pencil and flashe on paper
14.75 x 10 inches
$1,800
PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY
Jacqueline Surdell
I started from a place of embracing that which I cannot control

In our ongoing focus on artists working on the cusp of material culture, PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY is pleased to present Chicago artist Jacqueline Surdell in her first one-person exhibition, “I started from a place of embracing that which I cannot control”. This amazing young artist employs complex knotting, weaving, cutting and tying, upending a story of American idealism. The tapestries in the exhibition emerged since the lockdown of 2020, they reflect the angst of the times, triple knotted into complex terrains, a true gift of transference!!

The physical demands of Jacqueline Surdell’s process are extreme, with an oversized constructed loom and no mechanical assist for the weft. Jacqueline becomes her own shuttle, carrying pounds of rope and sundry materials, her force providing necessary tensile strength. The finished works are suspended by wood or steel rods, weighing an average of 150 lbs.

The works on view begin with a shower curtain, whose imagery depicts a single painting from the Hudson River School of Art in the 19th century.  Those heroic paintings offer a burgeoning national and spiritual American Ideal, an accordant utopia. In metaphoric disassociation with those artists, Surdell delivers a blow, as she shreds the curtains, disrupting their harmony. She employs historical knotting techniques from Korea, Japan, and First Nations, as well as maritime, architecture and fashion to surround and contravene the cultural homogeneity of the Hudson School with exquisite unmannered, reckless expanses. That one could imagine a redrawn historical map of articulated marred and damaged vistas in cascading geologic relief, whether planned or intuitively pursued, earmarks Surdell’s art.

Jacqueline Surdell, b.1993, received her MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2017. Exhibitions include New Orleans, Chicago, San Francisco and elsewhere, with her first international exhibition at Kunsthal KAdE, The Netherlands, “This Is America | Art USA Today”, curated by Robbert Roos.  Jacqueline Surdell’s tapestry along with Jeffrey Gibson’s boxing bag was featured in a review of the exhibition written by Janneke Wesseling, published in the daily newspaper NRC Handelsblad.

PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY

Left: Sacrifice of Columbia: Destruction (after Thomas Cole), 2020

Cotton cord, nylon cord, fabric, printed polyester shower curtain, American flag jacket, steel battle rope anchor, steel chain, canvas tarp, acrylic paint drips, wood armature

84 x 88 x 37 inches

$18,000

PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY

Destruction, 2021

Cotton cord, nylon cord, fabric, printed polyester shower curtain, steel battle rope anchor, steel, acrylic paint 

86 x 71 x 12 inches

$12,000

 

PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY

Straight-laced: The Consummation of Empire (after Thomas Cole), 2020-21

Cotton cord, nylon cord, paracord, printed polyester shower curtain, steel

96 x 64 x 14 inches

$14,000

 

PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY

We Will Win: Our Banner in the Sky (after Frederic Edwin Church), 2020-21

Cotton cord, nylon cord, paracord, printed polyester shower curtain, scholastic ribbons, acrylic paint drips, steel hanging hardware

84 x 99 x 12 inches

$18,000

PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY

Neon Hymn, 2020

Braided cotton cord, paracord, enamel, oil stick

80 x 28 x 12 inches

$5,500

PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY

Scylla III: The Pastoral State (after Thomas Cole), 2020

Cotton cord, nylon cord, Paracord, printed cotton towel, steel frame, volleyball

Frame: 27 x 27 x 1.5 inches

Floor extension & volleyball/coiled rope: 74 x 25x 9.5 inches

$4,500

PATRICIA SWEETOW GALLERY

Naturally Nasty Goes Dark, 2018

Braided cotton cord, acrylic, bronze

92 x 111 x 12 inches

$18,000

Friends Indeed Gallery
Livien Yin

For June on 8-bridges, Friends Indeed Gallery presents new work by Livien Yin.

Sensual Chinese men and androgynous figures take center stage in Livien Yin’s painting series, Paper Suns. The fictionalized portraits are inspired by the largely hidden experiences of Chinese-born “paper sons and daughters” who became American citizens by obtaining forged documents that stated they were children of Chinese Americans. In Paper Suns’ vignettes of leisure, Yin expands on her historical research to imagine what “paper” identities could have looked like in spite of the pervasive limitations experienced by many during the Chinese Exclusion era (1882-1943). Through repurposing imagery from Exclusion era photographs and American Realist paintings, Yin visualizes scenes of Chinese immigrants where desire, pleasure and new camaraderies set the tone.

Livien Yin received her BA from Reed College in 2012 and MFA from Stanford University in 2019. Her upcoming first solo show opens July 2021 at The New Gallery in Calgary, Alberta. She has been awarded a 2019-2020 Graduate Fellowship at Headlands Center for the Arts, the 2019 American Austrian Foundation Seebacher Prize for Fine Arts, and the 2019 Anita Squires Fowler Memorial Award in Photography. Yin lives and works in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Friends Indeed Gallery

Paper Sun, 2021

Gouache on paper

11.5 x 14 inches

$2,500

SOLD
Friends Indeed Gallery

Threshold, 2021

Oil on canvas

36 x 48 inches

$4,000

SOLD
Friends Indeed Gallery

Suey, 2020
Gouache on paper
Image: 13 x 9 inches

Framed: Approx. 20 x 16 inches (optional) 
$2,500

SOLD
Friends Indeed Gallery

The Reunion, 2020

Gouache on paper

Image: 14 x 8 inches

Framed: Approx. 20 x 16 inches

Available June 2-16 at http://headlands.org/auction

SOLD
Friends Indeed Gallery

Kin Gee Zapatería, 2021
Acrylic on linen
42 x 54 inches

$4,500

SOLD
Casemore Kirkeby
Todd Hido
The End Sends Advance Warning

“My previous project, Bright Black World, published in 2018, explored my feelings of a darker world that I saw us slipping into. To my great dismay, I see no reprieve or respite, And honestly, could anyone have imagined what was coming? Yet I continue to fight tooth & nail.

The first sentence of the essay written by Alexander Nemerov for Bright Black World is, “The end sends advance warning.” He could’ve stopped right there because those five words have infected me and my vision in the best way. I find that as a visual artist it often only takes a few good words to clarify and motivate one to create. Much of my new work is made with that phrase echoing in my subconscious as I look at the spaces I move through.”

— Todd Hido

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11788-6176, 2020
Archival pigment print
30 x 45 inches
$7,500

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11925-2492, 2020
Archival pigment print
30 x 40 inches
$7,500

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11753-1705, 2019
Archival pigment print
30 x 40 inches
$7,500

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11946-9910, 2019
Archival pigment print
30 x 45 inches
$7,500

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11946-9910, 2019
Archival pigment print
30 x 40 inches
$8,500

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11851-3642, 2020
Archival pigment print
30 x 45 inches
$7,500

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11937-8422, 2020
Archival pigment print
30 x 45 inches
$7,500

Casemore Kirkeby

Untitled 11927-6081, 2020
Archival pigment print
30 x 45 inches
$7,500

Pace Palo Alto
Damian Loeb
Wishful Thinking

Wishful Thinking, Damian Loeb’s debut presentation with Pace, is an off-world homage to the history of allegorical painting and comprises eight new paintings created in 2020 and 2021. Celebrating the relevance of representational work in a conceptual world, Loeb extends the genre of landscape painting to encompass new realms, translating the 19th century Romantic ideals of the sublime into contemporary images of the universe. He manipulates scale and composition to capture the spiritual awe of extra-terrestrial scenes, using classical art tropes to convey the escapist beauty in these strangely familiar expanses. Alluding to the Pygmalion myth, the show’s title refers to the desire of a certain reality rather than what exists. These works present distant landscapes as welcoming and a possible future home, yet simultaneously highlight the failure of verisimilitude—the fact that they will forever remain an “ideal”.

Following the tradition of early Baroque painters, these transcendent paintings seek to offer a spiritual salve for modern times and reference classical myths to examine themes such as martyrdom, faith, and sacrifice in their contemplation on the human condition. In Danae and the Shower of Gold (after Rubens) (2020), viewers see the gaseous folds of Jupiter mirror the modesty of fabric and plentiful flesh presented in Rubens’ painting of the same name.

Moving toward a new level of abstraction, the artist invites viewers to contemplate questions about an individual’s place in the infinite through this new body of work. Loeb’s paintings are “wishful thinking”: a meditation on fate as it manifests itself in beauty, and a false resolution—offered by myth—to find lost hope by anthropomorphizing the vast and mysterious images of other worlds, seemingly closer and better than the present one.

Pace Palo Alto
Consequences of War (after Rubens), 2021
Oil on linen
48 × 48 × 3 inches
Pace Palo Alto
Danae and the Shower of Gold (after Rubens), 2019
Oil on linen
20 × 20 × 2 inches
SOLD
Pace Palo Alto
The Fall of Phaeton (after Rubens), 2021
Oil on linen
48 × 48 × 3 inches
Pace Palo Alto
Roman Charity (after Rubens), 2021
Oil on linen
72 × 72 × 3 inches
Pace Palo Alto
Two Satyrs (after Rubens), 2020
Oil on linen
24 × 24 × 3 inches
SOLD
Pace Palo Alto
Pygmalion and Galatea (after Jean-Léon Gérôme), 2020
Oil on linen
SOLD
Pace Palo Alto
The Martyrdom of St Paul (after Tintoretto), 2020
Oil on linen
48 × 48 × 3 inches
SOLD
Pace Palo Alto
Romulus and Remus (after Rubens), 2021
Oil on linen
24 × 24 × 3 inches
SOLD
Art Drop
Conrad Guevara

Our latest Art Drop is Conrad Guevara’s Theatre Set #3 (death on the vine), 2021.

Conrad Guevara
Theatre Set #3 (death on the vine), 2021
Oil stick, steel, and fruit basket
10 x 12 inches
$1,000
California College of the Arts (CCA)

California College of the Arts (CCA) is a community of makers driven by an entrepreneurial spirit and reimagining a more equitable and sustainable future. The college offers a rich curriculum of 22 undergraduate and 11 graduate programs and is noted for its curricular interdisciplinarity and commitment to social responsibility. Students experience immersive exposure that emphasizes theory and practice alongside traditional craftsmanship, helping them gain the creative confidence needed for contemporary practice.

 

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