Eight bridges connect the San Francisco Bay, so it is an apt name for a gallery platform that brings the Bay Area art world together.

Our mission is to maintain a vibrant gallery scene, despite restrictions on travel, celebrations and other larger gatherings. We want to support our artists by informing and entertaining curators, collectors and critics with potent online exhibitions of their work.

On the first Thursday of every month, we will launch 8 shows of artists relevant to the Bay Area. They may be working in this place, long considered an epicenter of change, or deeply engaged in the conversations the Bay Area holds dear, whether it’s related to technology, the environment, social justice or sexual identity, to name a few. In addition, each month will highlight the crucial work of a Bay Area non-profit arts organization as its beneficiary, with an initial donation led by Phillips.

Founding Committee

Claudia Altman-Siegel, Kelly Huang, Sophia Kinell, Micki Meng, Daphne Palmer, Chris Perez, Sarah Wendell Sherrill, Jessica Silverman, and Elizabeth Sullivan

Ambassador Committee

Sayre Batton & Maja Thomas, Joachim & Nancy Bechtle, Matt Bernstein, Sabrina Buell, Wayee Chu & Ethan Beard, Natasha Boas, Douglas Durkin, Carla Emil, Matt & Jessica Farron, Lauren Ford, Ali Gass, Stanlee Gatti, Brook Hartzell & Tad Freese, Pamela & David Hornik, Katie & Matt Paige, Putter Pence, Becca Prowda & Daniel Lurie, Deborah Rappaport, Komal Shah & Gaurav Garg, Laura Sweeney, The Battery, Robin Wright, Sonya Yu & Zack Lara

Sponsors

Lobus, Phillips, The Space Program

Available to view in person
RESET
Simon Breitbard Fine Arts
Matt Devine, Jon Krawczyk, Markham Johnson, Kija Lucas

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts is pleased to present the work of Matt Devine, Jon Krawczyk, Markham Johnson, and Kija Lucas. Devine and Krawczyk conjure organic shapes inspired by nature from seemingly rigid, raw metals. The contrasts of nature and industry, light and shadow, chaos and order are themes explored by both sculptors.

Johnson’s photography, using a large format camera, immerses the viewer in the monumental power of the natural environment. His series, The Point of Kings: Point Reyes Rediscovered, is a narrative of West Marin, documenting the beauty, serenity and people that make up the Point Reyes National Sea Shore. Kija Lucas, in contrast, uses the photographic method of scanning to capture plant material gathered on location while following the emigration patterns of her family across the United States. Lucas connects these plants to the racial taxonomy of Carl Linnaeus while exploring concepts such as colonialism, heritage and, ultimately, home.

These works are on view at our San Francisco and Menlo Park galleries, which are currently open by appointment.

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Matt Devine
a x b #6, 2019
Aluminum with powder coat and automotive paint
88 x 48 x 36 inches
$37,000

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Matt Devine
1763 Study #2, 2020
Stainless steel with powder coat
24 x 12 x 12 inches
$5,000

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Jon Krawczyk
El Verde, 2019
Polished stainless steel with powder coat
22 x 21 x 5 inches
$8,500

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Jon Krawczyk
Sunset Over Gentle Winds, 2021
Polished stainless steel with powder coat
26 x 19 x 16 inches
$8,000

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Markham Johnson
Fallen Oak, 2012
Pigment ink print

Edition 4 of 4
60.5 x 76.5 inches
$8,750, framed

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Markham Johnson
Forest Sun, 2012
Pigment ink print
Edition 1 of 4
60.5 x 76.5 inches
$8,750, framed

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Kija Lucas
In Search of Home, Montezuma 294, 2015
Archival pigment print

Edition 1 of 5
42.75 x 32.75 inches
$5,000, framed

Simon Breitbard Fine Arts

Kija Lucas
In Search of Home, Untitled, 2013
Archival pigment print
Edition 1 of 5
42.75 x 32.75 inches
$5,000, framed

Paulson Fontaine Press
Woody De Othello
Shifting Through Space

Woody De Othello constructs intentionally wonky, anthropomorphized sculptures of common artifacts of domestic life—tables, radiators, flower vases, lamps, television sets—in glazed ceramic, bronze, wood, and glass. Othello infuses his work with humor, whimsy, and touches of African “Nkisi,” a belief system in which spirits inhabit everyday objects. In both his sculptures and works on paper, Othello imbues these static household objects with movement and emotion—they are often stretched or slumped over, seemingly overcome by gravity. He received a BFA from Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton and an MFA from the California College of Arts, San Francisco. He was included in the 33rd Ljublijana Biennial of Graphic Arts in Ljublijana, Slovenia, and has recently exhibited with Karma, New York (2019); Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco, California (2018); Quality, Oakland, California (2016); and UFO Gallery, Berkeley, California (2016). In 2019-2020, Othello was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the San Jose Museum of Art, California.

Paulson Fontaine Press

Isn’t This Still Life, 2021
Color sugarlift and spitbite aquatints and aquatint
29.5 x 22.75 inches
Edition of 30
$1,500

Paulson Fontaine Press

About That Time, 2021
Color softground etching and spitbite aquatint with drypoint
29.5 x 22.75 inches
Edition of 30
$1,500

Paulson Fontaine Press

Bright Spots, 2021
Color sugarlift aquatint and spitbite aquatint
29.5 x 22.75 inches
Edition of 30
$1,500

Paulson Fontaine Press

Another Sleepless Night, 2021
Color sugarlift and spitbite aquatints
32.5 x 44 inches
Edition of 30
$2,500

Paulson Fontaine Press

Shifting Through Space, 2021
Color softground etching with aquatint
43.5 x 37 inches
Edition of 40
$3,000

Paulson Fontaine Press

Steppin Through The Night, 2021
Color softground etching with aquatint
43.5 x 37 inches
Edition of 40
$3,000

Altman Siegel
Zarouhie Abdalian, Terry Adkins, Brandon Ndife

Altman Siegel is proud to present highlights from two current exhibitions currently on view at the gallery. We can decide, is a solo exhibition of brand new works by Zarouhie Abdalian and Cascadence is a group exhibition featuring the work of, amongst others, Terry Adkins and Brandon Ndife.

Throughout We can decide, a state of suspension pervades the space of the gallery and threnody for the unwilling martyrs is its emblem. Set just slightly in motion, five brass signaling bells sound out their indeterminate status, both and alternately signifying and hailing, marking and calling, meaning and doing. In recognition of the mass murder Abdalian asks us to lay at the feet of the U.S. government, it may be read as a memorial and an incitation.

Emerging during the mid-80’s in his native Washington D.C., Terry Adkins’ interdisciplinary history and use of reduced, abstracted forms complicate the impulse to settle on a singular, deterministic view of his artistic outcomes. His poetic reframing of found objects as ‘potential disclosures’ proposes a revaluing of objects as storied throughways of information. Viewed in the gallery is Tambour (2013), a presence rendering sound as silent. Hear, a witness of gravity’s impulse.

Described as a non-position between decay and regrowth, New Jersey-based artist Brandon Ndife’s sculptural works address the subjective nature of lived experience through detritus and symbolism. Activating commonplace, found, and inherited materials to question the limits and possible lives of objects, Ndife recasts living forms. Concerning entropy, both Nantucket and Nightshade Sidetable (both 2021) propose an oscillation between an aesthetic of evacuation and a process of becoming.

Altman Siegel
Zarouhie Abdalian
message (lower parts), 2021
Gypsum cement, graphite

13 5/8 x 17 1/2 x 1 5/8 inches

$12,000

Altman Siegel
Zarouhie Abdalian
monument to Prometheus, 2021
Engine block, terracotta

52 x 44 1/8 x 35 1/8 inches

$15,000

Altman Siegel
Zarouhie Abdalian
how many will die for the price of grain, 2021
Flexible intermediary bulk container (food grade)
132 1/4 x 132 1/4 inches
Edition 1 of 3
$6,000
Altman Siegel
Brandon Ndife
Nightshade Sidetable, 2021
Birch, earth pigments, various organic matter, cast AquaResin, enamel, urethane resin, aluminum

26 x 26 x 13 inches

$5,000

SOLD
Altman Siegel
Brandon Ndife
Nantucket, 2021
Cast Aqua resin, earth pigment, enamel, wood, rubber

25 x 49 x 7 inches

$6,000

Altman Siegel
Terry Adkins
Tambour, 2013
Lace, tambourine, and music stand

59 x 18 x 18 inches

$100,000

Altman Siegel
Zarouhie Abdalian
threnody for the unwilling martyrs, 2021
Signaling bells, modular pipe, electronics
Dimensions variable
$25,000
Altman Siegel
Zarouhie Abdalian
events, 2021
Xenon flash, LED, electronics
Dimensions variable
$12,000
Brian Gross Fine Art
Karl Benjamin
Selected Paintings 1967-1978

Brian Gross Fine Art is pleased to present Karl Benjamin: Selected Paintings 1967-1978. A major Southern California painter and one of the original Hard-edge abstract painters, the exhibition focuses on Benjamin’s intensive exploration of color relationships through compositional structure.

An intuitive painter, Karl Benjamin (1925-2012) was deeply interested in the expressive possibilities created by combining and shaping color. Works such as #14 (1977) employ fuchsias, blues, greens, and reds as narrow stripes of contrasting colors that vibrate with intensity. In #3 (1969) Benjamin divided the canvas into irregular polygons, where interlocking areas of red, orange, yellow and blue form a composition without end. Works like #1 (1970) are visually charged, gridded arrangements of right triangles, whose complex arrangements of color both imply and subvert a sense of perceptual depth. Benjamin’s use of bold pattern and color, combined with the deceptively flat surfaces of his paintings, give each work a unique optical presence.

In 1959, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art organized a landmark exhibition entitled “Four Abstract Classicists” presenting works by four Los Angeles artists: Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson, Frederick Hammersley, and John McLaughlin. The show’s curator coined the term “hard edge painting,” noting their similar stylistic concerns. Their works are characterized by clean edged, conjoined geometric forms rendered in flat color and occupying the entire picture plane. Benjamin’s work has been featured in numerous important exhibitions, including Birth of the Cool: California Art, Design and Culture at Midcentury, which debuted at the Orange County Museum of Art in 2007 and later travelled to the Oakland Museum and other U.S. venues; A Conversation With Color: Karl Benjamin, Paintings 1953 – 1995 at the Claremont Museum of Art, in 2009; and Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A. Paintings and Sculpture 1945-1970 at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, in 2011.

Brian Gross Fine Art

#8, 1967, 1967
Oil on canvas
48 x 36 inches
$60,000

Brian Gross Fine Art

#14, 1977, 1977
Oil on canvas
50 x 72 1/2 inches
$65,000

Brian Gross Fine Art

#1, 1970, 1970
Oil on canvas
57 x 57 inches

SOLD
Brian Gross Fine Art

#10, 1970, 1970
Oil on canvas
28 x 68 inches

SOLD
Brian Gross Fine Art

#12, 1976, 1976
Oil on canvas
43 x 43 inches
$50,000

Brian Gross Fine Art

#3, 1969, 1969
Oil on canvas
50 1/4 x 50 1/4 inches
$55,000

Brian Gross Fine Art

#17, 1977, 1977
Oil on canvas
50 x 60 1/2 inches
$60,000

Brian Gross Fine Art

#13, 1968, 1968
Oil on canvas
24 x 24 inches
$26,000

Ratio 3
James Sterling-Pitt
Works on Paper

As the bracketed dates in their titles indicate, each of Pitt’s drawings is a record of elapsed time. Aside from corresponding to a specific period in the artist’s life and practice, the drawings are determined by intuition, rather than strict diaristic record-keeping. Where some drawings are populated exclusively by a grid-like procession of forms, others are interspersed with fragments of language or still-life renderings of objects in the artist’s studio.

Through a combination of densely colored forms, glyph-like clusters of lines, and cryptic–yet evocative–handwritten text, Pitt’s works on paper offer an intimate access point into the artist’s practice. Each drawing can be interpreted equally as a calendar for an autobiographical understanding of time, or as an array of free-associative schematics for an ever-evolving body of work.

Ratio 3

Untitled (August 18 – October 16, 2020), 2020
Acrylic, watercolor, and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500

Ratio 3
Untitled (March 5, 2017 – May 22, 2017), 2017
Acrylic, watercolor, and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500
Ratio 3
Untitled (March 29, 2017 – September 30, 2017), 2017
Acrylic, watercolor, and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500
Ratio 3
Untitled (March 5, 2017 – May 22, 2017), 2017
Acrylic, watercolor, and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500
Ratio 3
Untitled (March 25 – April 3, 2015), 2015
Acrylic and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500
Ratio 3
Untitled (October 13 – October 27, 2015), 2015
Acrylic, watercolor, and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500
Ratio 3
Untitled (October 27 – November 10, 2015), 2015
Acrylic, watercolor, and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500
Ratio 3
Untitled (October 5 – October 16, 2015), 2015
Acrylic, watercolor pencil, and graphite on paper
30 x 22 inches
$2,500
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Marcela Pardo Ariza, Chis Fallon, Amy Nathan, James Perkins and Terri Loewenthal
Janus II - Selections

“Revolution is not a one time event.” – Audre Lorde

Continuing the celebration of CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions’ seven year anniversary, and in light of many transitions globally and locally, we are delighted to present a second part to the Janus exhibition we presented digitally in the autumn of 2020. Janus II draws from the gallery’s past seven years and offers a glimpse into its next seven with work by Miya Ando, Marcela Pardo Ariza, Chris Fallon, Rebekah Goldstein, Amy Lincoln, Terri Loewenthal, Masako Miki, Amy Nathan, and James Perkins presented physically at Fused Space, and here on 8-bridges with works by Pardo-Ariza, Fallon, Loewenthal, Nathan, and Perkins.

Much has shifted since CULT was born: public optimism collapsed under the weight of emboldened racial bigotry, anti-globalist populism, and policy decisions that have wrought untold harm on the environment and marginalized individuals. On this occasion for reflection we consider Janus, the two-headed Roman deity presiding over the future and the past, transitions and doorways. As we navigate thresholds, at once cultural, political, and biological, the duality of Janus allows us to envision a stronger, more equitable future fueled by a cognizance of our shared responsibility to the planet and to each other.

Works by Pardo Ariza and Perkins investigate care and belongingness and the role language plays in building our realities and communities—Pardo Ariza creates a trans-historical kinship bringing the archive in dialogue with the contemporary, while Perkins labors the boundaries of materiality. Works by Loewenthal re-imagine our relationship and responsibility to the land; the works of Nathan and Fallon reconsider the illusionistic permanence of our current structures and identities—retrieving histories of the past to build new systems for a new world, one that prioritizes and benefits us all. Janus is a talisman for optimism in light of a polarized cultural climate; this exhibition meditates upon the opportunities, rather than challenges, that arise from the ‘new normal’ we are collectively living.

To make an appointment to see the full exhibition, contact us at info@cultexhibitions.com.

CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions

Marcela Pardo Ariza

Rosie, Cait & Kat (1987~, 2018), 2018

Mounted inkjet print, ash artist frame, pool blue paint

53 x 53 inches

Edition of 3

$6,000

CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions

Marcela Pardo Ariza

Randy Andy, Dollface, Tania, Lu, Louis, et al. (1983~, 1975~, 1992~, 2018), 2018

Mounted inkjet print, ash artist frame, rosy blush paint

66 3/4 x 30 inches

Edition of 3

$8,000

CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Amy Nathan
Mascara Medusa, 2020
Hydrocal, acrylic, flashe, sunglasses
22 x 19.5 x 1 inches
$4,200
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Amy Nathan
Auto Embelish, 2020
Flashe on paper
40 x 26 inches
$6,800
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Terri Loewenthal
Psychscape 06 (Gold Lake, CA), 2017
Archival Pigment Print
40 x 30 inches
Edition of 3 plus 2 AP
$17,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Chris Fallon
Chicken Cup
Acrylic on wood panel
24 x 24 inches
$4,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Chris Fallon
Loaded Compliment, 2021
Acrylic on wood panel
18 x 24 inches
$3,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions

James Perkins

The Weight of My Appearance (Black), 2016

Hand carved marble, linen, aluminum, wood, plastic

36 x 8 x 80 inches

$15,000

Robert Koch Gallery
Edward Burtynsky, Adam Katseff, Mimi Plumb, Nancy Wilson-Pajic

For four decades Edward Burtynsky has explored through diverse photographic projects the complex global intersection of industrial growth and environmental impact. Edward Burtynsky’s color photographs document the many facets of landscape as it is transformed through human industry. Exquisitely detailed and exactingly rendered, his images strike an intricate balance between a somber reportage and a powerfully seductive aesthetic, reflecting the dilemma between society’s desire for prosperity and its impact on the environment.

Adam Katseff’s reductive photographs while minimalist in approach, on closer inspection present the viewer with rich and exceptional detail. His Rivers and Falls series feature iconic locations, which also captivated and inspired influential earlier artists. This is no coincidence, as Katseff conceptually set off to recapture these specific locations and in doing so recontextualize the landscape. Katseff remarks, “The subjects of my recent work are at the same time familiar and elusive. The outline of the image is easy to see, and as with memory our imagination must supply the rest.”

Mimi Plumb’s dystopian images provide the viewer with a narrative that is as much ominous as it is seductively mesmerizing and compassionately human. In her early twenties, Mimi Plumb looked back to her Californian childhood to make a series of photographs about suburban youth.

French-American conceptual artist Nancy Wilson-Pajic, played a seminal role in the international artistic avant-garde during the 1960s and 70s with her feminist performances and text-sound installations that challenged feminine role model in modern societal paradigms. The artist moved to Paris in 1978 where she began to experiment with photography along with forms of text-based imagery. Her early experiments with photography lead her to alternative processes such as these unique cyanotype photograms.

Robert Koch Gallery

Edward Burtynsky
Shipbreaking #9A, Chittagong, Bangladesh, 2000/2001
Chromogenic print
From a sold out edition of 10 + 2 AP’s
Signed, titled, dated and editioned verso mount
27 x 34 inches, image
34 x 41 inches, mount
$24,000, framed

Robert Koch Gallery

Edward Burtynsky
Cerro Prieto Geothermal Station, Sonora, Mexico, 2012/2013
Chromogenic print
Edition of 6 + 2 AP’s
Signed, titled, dated and editioned verso
48 x 64 inches, image and mount
$27,000, framed

Robert Koch Gallery

Adam Katseff
River XVII, 2014/2021
Lacquered pigment ink print
Edition of 5 + 2 AP’s
Signed, titled, dated and editioned verso
43 x 53 3/4 inches, image and mount
$12,500, framed

Robert Koch Gallery

Adam Katseff
Waterfall VII, 2014/2021
Lacquered pigment ink print
Edition of 3 + 2 AP’s
Signed, titled, dated and editioned verso
30 x 24 inches, image and mount
$5,500, framed

Robert Koch Gallery

Mimi Plumb
Two girls at the festival, 1975/2020
Pigment ink print
Edition of 8 + 2 AP’s
Signed, titled, dated and editioned verso
16 x 20 inches
$2,500, unframed

Robert Koch Gallery

Mimi Plumb
Highway 4, 1975/2021
Pigment ink print
Edition of 8 + 2 AP’s
Signed, titled, dated and editioned verso
20 x 24 inches
$3,200, unframed

Robert Koch Gallery

Nancy Wilson-Pajic
Falling Angels n° 19, 1996
Unique cyanotype photogram
Signed, titled and dated verso
59 1/16 x 59 1/16 inches, image and mount
$29,000, framed

Robert Koch Gallery

Nancy Wilson-Pajic
Divas: Coiffe (headdress), 2004
Unique cyanotype photogram
Signed, titled and dated verso
36 5/8 x 29 1/8 inches, image
43 x 36 inches, mount
$18,000, framed

 

*Photogram of headdress from the collection of theater costumes of the Nouveau Musée National de Monaco

Art Drop
Amalia Pica

Our latest Art Drop is Amalia Pica’s Joy in Paperwork #317-319.

Joy in Paperwork #317-319 consists of a suite of 3 drawings — part of an owning series by the same name. All made using office rubber stamps, like those found in postal or immigration services, these quirky, playful works poke fun at bureaucracy and the monotony of administrative tasks. Pica has restricted her palette to the three ink colors most commonly used in official paperwork–black, red and blue–and with that, achieves a vast array of recognizable images that verge on abstraction including cacti, sunbeams, pylons, earthworms, the river Thames. A closer look at each reveals a network of stamp markings which read, in various languages, “paid,” “private,” “confidential,” “received,” “cancelled,” along other official directives.

Given the repetition and tangle of stamps, one can imagine an office worker driven to distraction by piles of paperwork. This joyful installation also speaks of a bygone era, before digitalisation, when letters and documents were rubber stamped by hand.

Courtesy the artist and Instituto de Visión.

Curated by 8-bridges from EXPO CHGO ONLINE.

Amalia Pica
Joy in Paperwork #317-319, 2016
Papel A4 y tinta de sello / A4 paper and stamp ink
30 x 21 cm (each)
$6,000

The Institute of Contemporary Art San José (ICA)

Established in 1980, The Institute of Contemporary Art San José (ICA) is a non-collecting contemporary art museum committed to examining the most urgent contemporary issues through the lens of artistic practice. Located in downtown San José, the ICA provides a platform for changing, enlarging, and broadening the art historical canon, providing visibility and critical examination for the most inclusive selection of artists in the Bay Area and beyond. The ICA is equally committed to reflecting the diversity of its audiences and offering engagement with the best contemporary art practice for free. Support the ICA San José here.

Become a member of ICA San José Social Club to gain access to unique “master class” programs and other exclusive events.

Installation view of Amir H. Fallah: The Facade Project, 2020. Photo by Impart Photography.

 

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