Eight bridges connect the San Francisco Bay, so it is an apt name for a gallery platform that brings the Bay Area art world together.

Our mission is to maintain a vibrant gallery scene, despite restrictions on travel, celebrations and other larger gatherings. We want to support our artists by informing and entertaining curators, collectors and critics with potent online exhibitions of their work.

On the first Thursday of every month, we will launch 8 shows of artists relevant to the Bay Area. They may be working in this place, long considered an epicenter of change, or deeply engaged in the conversations the Bay Area holds dear, whether it’s related to technology, the environment, social justice or sexual identity, to name a few. In addition, each month will highlight the crucial work of a Bay Area non-profit arts organization as its beneficiary, with an initial donation led by Phillips.

Founding Committee

Claudia Altman-Siegel, Kelly Huang, Sophia Kinell, Micki Meng, Daphne Palmer, Chris Perez, Sarah Wendell Sherrill, Jessica Silverman, and Elizabeth Sullivan

Ambassador Committee

Sayre Batton & Maja Thomas, Joachim & Nancy Bechtle, Matt Bernstein, Sabrina Buell, Wayee Chu & Ethan Beard, Natasha Boas, Douglas Durkin, Carla Emil, Matt & Jessica Farron, Lauren Ford, Ali Gass, Stanlee Gatti, Brook Hartzell & Tad Freese, Pamela & David Hornik, Katie & Matt Paige, Putter Pence, Becca Prowda & Daniel Lurie, Deborah Rappaport, Komal Shah & Gaurav Garg, Laura Sweeney, The Battery, Robin Wright, Sonya Yu & Zack Lara

Sponsors

Lobus, Phillips, The Space Program

Haines Gallery
Binh Danh
Of Stone and Space

In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Haines Gallery proudly presents a suite of new daguerreotypes of Yosemite National Park by Bay Area photographer Binh Danh. With their ethereal images of Yosemite’s sweeping vistas, snow-capped peaks, and glacial ponds, these stunningly detailed works reveal the artist’s full command of this complex process. 

Though raised in California following his and his family’s escape from wartorn Vietnam, Danh had not visited Yosemite until he began his daguerreotype project, documenting his lived experience of a previously imagined landscape. Danh explains, “I am interested in how we as a nation of immigrants could ‘reflect’ on these daguerreotypes and see our faces in this landscape.” The highly reflective surfaces of Danh’s daguerreotypes literally mirror their surroundings, embracing viewers within the idyllic environs of this national landmark.

Danh’s innovative approach to historic photo processes reconsiders and expands the pursuit of pioneering nineteenth century photographers such as Ansel Adams and Carleton Watkins. For over a decade, Danh has traveled across the American West in a mobile darkroom he calls Louis (after Louis Daguerre), using large-format cameras modified to accept silver plates rather than film negatives. Throughout the work, Danh imbues his subject with a distinctly personal perspective, as he negotiates his connection as a Vietnamese-American to the landscape and history of the United States, raising questions of access and belonging within these iconic scenes.

El Capitan in Winter, 2021
Daguerreotype (in camera exposure)
12 x 10 inches

Unique
$12,500

Half Dome, Merced River, Winter (1), 2021
Daguerreotype (in camera exposure)
12 x 10 inches

Unique
$12,500

Yosemite Valley View (1), Winter, 2021
Daguerreotype (in camera exposure)
8 x 10 inches

Unique
$10,500

Bridalveil Fall, winter, 2021
Daguerreotype (in camera exposure)
10 x 8 inches

Unique
$10,500