Eight bridges connect the San Francisco Bay, so it is an apt name for a gallery platform that brings the Bay Area art world together.

Our mission is to maintain a vibrant gallery scene, despite restrictions on travel, celebrations and other larger gatherings. We want to support our artists by informing and entertaining curators, collectors and critics with potent online exhibitions of their work.

On the first Thursday of every month, we will launch 8 shows of artists relevant to the Bay Area. They may be working in this place, long considered an epicenter of change, or deeply engaged in the conversations the Bay Area holds dear, whether it’s related to technology, the environment, social justice or sexual identity, to name a few.

Founding Committee

Claudia Altman-Siegel, Kelly Huang, Sophia Kinell, Micki Meng, Daphne Palmer, Chris Perez, Sarah Wendell Sherrill, Jessica Silverman, and Elizabeth Sullivan

Ambassador Committee

Sayre Batton & Maja Thomas, Joachim & Nancy Bechtle, Matt Bernstein, Sabrina Buell, Wayee Chu & Ethan Beard, Natasha Boas, Douglas Durkin, Carla Emil, Matt & Jessica Farron, Lauren Ford, Ali Gass, Stanlee Gatti, Brook Hartzell & Tad Freese, Pamela & David Hornik, Katie & Matt Paige, Putter Pence, Becca Prowda & Daniel Lurie, Deborah Rappaport, Komal Shah & Gaurav Garg, Laura Sweeney, The Battery, Robin Wright, Sonya Yu & Zack Lara

Sponsors

Lobus, Phillips, The Space Program

Altman Siegel
Nick Cave, Troy Chew, Wade Guyton, Samuel Levi Jones, Lynn Hershman Leeson, K.R.M. Mooney, Torey Thornton
I Yield My Time. Fuck You!

The yielding of time signals a consciousness of how little space and agency we are granted – and the importance of leaving some for those who too often go unheard. Three weeks into nationwide protests against police brutality brought on by the murder of George Floyd, the Los Angeles Police Commission hosted a virtual community meeting via Zoom. After six hours of citizens decrying the police department’s violence and most recent misconduct towards demonstrators, Jeremy Frisch wasted none of his 30-second time limit. This exhibition takes its title from Frisch’s eloquent tirade turned viral rally cry.

In moments of revolution we might locate clarity through distance from our prior consciousness. 2020 has offered arguably the most refined example of such an opportunity in our collective lives. Works exhibited six months ago might find radically different meaning within our new social context. With that in mind our exhibition proposes juxtapositions between different artist methodologies regarding societal collapse and social upheaval. Models of representation for these types of historical fulcrums can pull from a spectrum of sources, ranging from future fantasy aesthetics to something more closely resembling documentary. The reverberation between different methodologies is where the crux of the exhibition lies.

This exhibition is on view at the gallery through December 19th. To make an appointment to visit in person please use this link or email us at info@altmansiegel.com.

Troy Chew
Too Many Names, 2020
Oil and dye on canvas with appliqué
60 x 72 in
152.4 x 182.9 cm
Nick Cave
Untitled, 2018
Mixed media including a bronze open
hand with carved heads
4 x 5 1/2 x 12 1/4 in
10.2 x 14 x 31.1 cm
K.R.M. Mooney
Strike i-iii, 2020
Cast bronze, olivine sand
30 x 12 x 10 in
76.2 x 30.5 x 25.4 cm
Each: 8 x 9 x 10 in.
Samuel Levi Jones
Resolute, 2020
Artbooks, encyclopedia, history, and law books on canvas
90 x 100 in
228.6 x 254 cm
SOLD
Wade Guyton
Untitled, 2020
Epson UltraChrome HDX inkjet on linen
84 x 69 in
213.4 x 175.3 cm
Lynn Hershman Leeson
Present Tense, 2012
Network-based multimedia installation
(video and live data real time feeds, aquarium, sensor, screens)
Programming by Mark Hellar
25 x 19 x 15 in
63.5 x 48.3 x 38.1 cm
Edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof (#1/3)
Lynn Hershman Leeson
Redhalothermogram, 2020
Archival digital print on paper
36 3/4 x 18 1/2 in
93.3 x 47 cm
Edition of 5 (#1/5)
Torey Thornton
Which aside’s aside (Nov 4, 2019), 2020
Nissan NV200 taxi wall partition (upper) (activated from 2014- 2018)
50 1/2 x 24 x 8 3/4 in
128.3 x 61 x 22.2 cm
Berggruen Gallery
Austin Eddy, Alicia McCarthy, Clare Kirkconnell, Des Lawrence, Jenny Sharaf, James Hugonin, Matthew Feyld, Paul Kremer
Recent Paintings

Berggruen Gallery is pleased to present Recent Paintings, an extensive exploration of light, color, and composition through the medium of paint. Whether it be whimsical abstraction or meticulous realism, the paintings juxtapose one another to open dialogues regarding how artists render their surrounding world. This show features a dynamic and diverse group of artists from several different countries, from the United States to South Korea to the United Kingdom.

Austin Eddy

To Question The Existence Of Tragedy, The Tarrying Pair., 2019

Oil, flashe, colored pencil, and paper on canvas

78 x 54 inches

198.1 x 137.2 centimeters

$15,000

James Hugonin

Binary Rhythm (VI), 2013-14

Oil and wax on wood

74 9/16 x 66 1/2 inches 

189.5 x 169 centimeters
$175,000

Kremer, Paul

Glow 04, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

40 x 30 inches

101.6 x 76.2 centimeters
$14,000

Alicia McCarthy

Untitled, 2020

Colored pencil, house paint, and spray paint on wood

15 3/4 x 19 3/4 inches

40 x 50.2 centimeters
$7,000

Clare Kirkconnell

Torryne’s Bouquet, 2020

Oil on canvas

60 x 60 inches

152.4 x 152.4 centimeters
$38,000

Des Lawrence

Wanda Ferragamo, 2019

Enamel on aluminum

11 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches

30 x 25 centimeters
$12,000

Jenny Sharaf

Untitled (stop the music), 2020

Paint on fabric over canvas

72 x 60 inches

182.9 x 152.4 centimeters
$15,000

Matthew Feyld

Untitled, 2018-20

Acrylic, pigments and modeling paste on canvas over panel

16 x 16 inches

40.6 x 40.6 centimeters
$3,000
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
Marcela Pardo Ariza, Troy Chew, Rebekah Goldstein, Nasim Hantehzadeh, Terri Loewenthal, Masako Miki, Amy Nathan, and Curtis Talwst Santiago
Janus

“Revolution is not a one time event.” – Audre Lorde

On the occasion of CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions’ Seven Year Anniversary, we are delighted to present an exhibition that draws from the gallery’s past seven years and offers a glimpse into its next seven. Much has shifted since CULT was born: public optimism collapsed under the weight of emboldened racial bigotry, anti-globalist populism, and policy decisions that have wrought untold harm on the environment and marginalized individuals. On this occasion for reflection we consider Janus, the two-headed Roman deity presiding over the future and the past, transitions and doorways. As we navigate thresholds, at once cultural, political, and biological, the duality of Janus allows us to envision a stronger, more equitable future fueled by a cognizance of our shared responsibility to the planet and to each other. Works by Pardo Ariza, Hantehzadeh, and Chew investigate care and belongingness and the role language plays in building our realities and communities. Photographs by Loewenthal re-imagine our relationship and responsibility to the land; sculptures by Miki investigate wisdom in trans-pacific indigenous traditions and how objects function as figures and collaborators rather than items for exploitation and instrumentalization. Finally, the works of Goldstein, Nathan, and Santiago reconsider the illusionistic permanence of our current structures—retrieving histories of the past to build new systems for a new world, one that prioritizes and benefits us all. Janus is a talisman for optimism in light of a polarized cultural climate; this exhibition meditates upon the opportunities, rather than challenges, that arise from the ‘new normal’ we are collectively living.

To schedule an appointment to see works, or Troy Chew’s solo exhibition Yadadamean at the gallery, please contact info@cultexhibitions.com

Marcela Pardo Ariza
Linda, Lee & Dorsey, Louis (1988, 2018), 2018
Mounted inkjet print, ash artist’s frame, twilight blue paint
58 x 29 inches (corner)
147.3 x 73.7 cm
Edition of 3
$5,600
Terri Loewenthal
Psychscape 33 (Mount Olsen, CA), 2018
Archival Pigment Print
80 x 60 inches
203.2 x 152.4 cm
Edition of 2 plus 1 artist’s proof
$30,000
Nasim Hantehzadeh
Bani Adam, 2018
Oil pastel, colored pencil, and graphite on paper
95 x 178 inches
241.3 x 452.1 cm
Rebekah Goldstein
Heart Of Stone, 2020
Oil and acrylic on canvas
60 1/2 x 55 inches
153.7 x 139.7 cm
$19,000

Masako Miki
口裂け女 Kuchisake-onna (Mouth tear woman), 2018
Wool on foam, cherry Wood
42 x 71 x 13 inches
106.7 x 180.3 x 33 cm

Troy Chew
Five on it, 2020
Oil on Canvas
48 x 36 inches
121.9 x 91.4 cm
Amy Nathan
Mascara Medusa, 2020
Ink, flashe and colored pencil on paper
22 x 30 inches
55.9 x 76.2 cm
$3,200

Curtis Tawlst Santiago
African Knight Helmet 3, 2017
Wire and beads on steel armature
14 x 10 x 11 inches
35.6 x 25.4 x 27.9 cm
$12,000

Haines Gallery
Shiva Ahmadi, Ai Weiwei, Kota Ezawa and Mike Henderson
The Art of Protest

To speak to these turbulent times, Haines Gallery presents The Art of Protest, a group exhibition that finds inspiration in the vital and creative acts of dissent registered by artists through their work. Always on the vanguard of social change, the artists included here offer new forms of resistance to injustice, dare to speak truth to the mendacity of power, and remind us that many of the concerns we face today are not new—and are all the more urgent for enduring. 

Featuring artworks by Shiva Ahmadi, Ai Weiwei, Kota Ezawa, and Mike Henderson

To view any of these works in person, please contact kira@hainesgallery to schedule a visit.

Ai Weiwei
Bicycle Basket with Flowers in Porcelain, 2014
Porcelain
11 x 14 1/2 x 13 1/4 inches
27.9 x 36.8 x 33.6 cm
Price Upon Request

Ai Weiwei
Handcuffs, 2012
Wood
16 x 5 x 1 inches
40.6 x 12.7 x 2.5 cm
Price Upon Request

Shiva Ahmadi
Gabriel’s Horn, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
72 x 60 inches
182.9 x 152.4 cm
$35,000

Shiva Ahmadi
Untitled, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
20 x 16 inches
50.8 x 40.6 cm
$6,000

Kota Ezawa
Jimi Hendrix meets Josef Albers, 2016
Duratrans transparency and light box
20 1/2 x 30 1/2 x 3 inches
52 x 77.5 x 7.6 cm
$12,000

Kota Ezawa
National Anthem (Oakland Raiders), 2019
Watercolor on paper
Paper: 13 x 23 inches / Frame: 16 x 26 inches
Paper: 33 x 58.4 cm / Frame: 40.6 x 66 cm
$10,000

Mike Henderson
The Singers, c. 1960s
Oil on canvas
69 x 120 inches
175.3 x 304.8 cm
Price Upon Request

Mike Henderson
Untitled
Watercolor on paper
6 x 9 inches
15.2 x 22.9 cm
$1,000

Hosfelt Gallery
Lordy Rodriguez
Polar Democracy

Twenty-four years ago, Lordy Rodriguez started using a visual lexicon of map-based forms as metaphors for defining an individual’s position within a culture or society. For his current exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery, Rodriguez utilizes this cartography-inspired vocabulary to ruminate on issues about democracy and its precarious existence.

Like many of us, Rodriguez is a news junky—fixated on unfolding stories of unequal access to resources, the violent quelling of peaceful demonstrations, and governments that poison political rivals or enact laws to disenfranchise their citizenry.  The work in this exhibition focuses on the bravery inherent in demanding a place at the table.

The first series memorializes historic and contemporary efforts at peaceful demonstration. These include the 1930 Salt March, led by Mohandas Gandhi challenging British rule over India; the Langa March of 1960, in which 30,000 to 50,000 demonstrators marched in opposition to apartheid; the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery; and recent pro-democracy protests against Mainland China’s oppression in Hong Kong. In Rodriguez’s cartographic lexicon, these routes are “code-switched” in candy-colored references to race and oppression.

The second series represents efforts by those in power to manipulate the boundaries of voting districts in order to favor a political party or racial group. While researching these gerrymandered districts, Rodriguez realized many of them were regions in which members of his Filipino-American family live — states like Texas and Florida with large immigrant populations. The pieces here represent some of the most egregious examples of voter suppression as well as districts in which activists and courts have compelled boundaries to be re-drawn in ways that are more equitable.

Born in the Philippines in 1976, Lordy Rodriguez was raised in Texas and Louisiana. He received a BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York and an MFA from Stanford University.

Lordy Rodriguez
Texas 33rd, 2020
ink on paper
35 x 60 in
88.9 x 152.4 cm
$16,000

Lordy Rodriguez
Salt March, 2020
ink on paper
78 x 34 in
198.1 x 86.4 cm
$20,000

Lordy Rodriguez
Selma to Montgomery, 2020
ink on paper
26 x 52 in
66 x 132.1 cm
$15,000

Lordy Rodriguez
Texas 35th, 2020
ink on paper
44 x 26 in
111.8 x 66 cm
$14,000

Lordy Rodriguez
Illinois 4th, 2020
ink on paper
24 x 34 in
61 x 86.4 cm
$12,000

Lordy Rodriguez
Hong Kong Protests, 2020
ink on paper
36 x 64 in
91.4 x 162.6 cm
$17,000

Lordy Rodriguez
Evolution of NC 12th, 2020
ink on paper
18 x 60 in
45.7 x 152.4 cm
$14,000

Lordy Rodriguez
Langa March, 2020
ink on paper
34 x 60 in
86.4 x 152.4 cm
$16,000

Jenkins Johnson Gallery
Dewey Crumpler
Visual Rhythm

Jenkins Johnson presents eight paintings by Dewey Crumpler, San Francisco Art Institute Associate Professor. His new Visual Rhythm series examines powerful structures that frame social interpretations. He also exposes the malleability that leads to empowerment and liberation. Re-contextualizing symbols such as the tulip and top hat, Crumpler examines Black consciousness, transforming space and time.

In the 19th and 20th centuries the top hat was a symbol of intelligence and means. Mimicking this symbol of white sophistication, ex-slaves developed a dance called the Cakewalk which transformed this elitist symbol into an avenue for mockery. This dance was adapted by whites, unaware of its sarcastic intent. This started the dance craze that led to the Lindy Hop and the Charleston. Crumpler’s series is also influenced by rhythm and blues, rock and roll, bebop, hip hop and jazz greats including Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, and John Coltrane.

The grids in Crumpler’s Visual Rhythm paintings reflect the skeletal structures that metaphorically hold our world together. His grids transform from barrier to agents of change, as symbolic elements create rhythms of endless angles, perspectives, and shadows. While we rely on the “grid” to interpret our world, Crumpler reminds us of its instability.

Dewey Crumpler
Bright Moments, 2020
acrylic on canvas
72 x 60 inches
$20,000

Dewey Crumpler
The Tilt, 2020
acrylic on canvas
72 x 60 inches
$20,000

Dewey Crumpler
In the Deep, 2020
acrylic on canvas
72 x 60 inches
$20,000

Dewey Crumpler
Bitches Brewing In Space, 2020
acrylic on canvas
86 x 60 inches
$24,000

Dewey Crumpler
Yellow Mist, 2020
acrylic on canvas
48 x 36 inches
$10,000

Dewey Crumpler
Kaufman’s Beatitudes #3, 2020
acrylic on canvas
38 x 26 inches
$9,000

Dewey Crumpler
Blue Mist, 2020
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches
$9,000

Dewey Crumpler
Birth, Cool & Hip, 2020
acrylic on canvas
86 x 60 inches
$24,000

 

Paulson Fontaine Press
Lonnie Holley
Energies In The Air

The genesis of this group of collages began when Holley noticed a piece of old plywood in the studio during a visit to Paulson Fontaine Press. Lonnie grabbed our jigsaw and started cutting out figures, exposing his predilection for nested and overlapping human forms, chambered nautiluses of ancestry, community, and the promises of a future within the past.

Paul Arnett writes, “Within this process, Holley references his art-making roots: woodblock prints were made from jigsawed plywood forms pieced together into a single wood “plate.” (Holley’s original outdoor art environment, constructed in the 1980s and ’90s in Birmingham, was ringed by cutout wooden forms much like these.) With these understatedly autobiographical prints, he has reimagined a staple of yard art—the plywood cutout—as the basis for a distinctly fine-art medium—the print—while referencing an ancient civilization that existed (like American music) at the boundary of Europe and Africa.”

Born in Alabama, Lonnie Holley is an internationally renowned artist and performer whose three-decade-long career has encompassed drawing, painting, sculpture, and music. Holley’s paintings, found-object sculptures and environments are made of both natural and manmade elements. The densely constructed pieces reference current events and African American history and, like his musical lyrics, refer to slavery, the church, and universal ecology. Holley’s work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia Museum of Art; New Orleans Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. He is represented by the James Fuentes Gallery, NY.

 

Lonnie Holley 
Energies in the Air, 2018
Collage on museum board with spray paint.
60 x 52 in
152.4 x 132.08 cm
$30,500 framed with Museum Optium
Lonnie Holley 
Faith is the Aftermath of Destruction, 2019
Collage on museum board with spray paint.
60 x 104 in
152.4 x 264.16 cm
$50,000 unframed
Lonnie Holley 
Heading for the Brightness, 2019
Collage on museum board with spray paint.
60 x 104 in
152.4 x 264.16 cm
$50,000 unframed
Lonnie Holley 
Humans and the Watchful Eyes, 2019
Collage on museum board with spray paint.
60 x 104 in
152.4 x 264.16 cm
$50,000 unframed
Lonnie Holley 
Placement, 2018
Collage on museum board.
60 x 52 in
152.4 x 132.08 cm
$30,500 framed with Museum Optium
Lonnie Holley 
The Ghostness of Blackness, 2019
Collage on museum board with spray paint.
60 x 104 in
152.4 x 264.16 cm
$50,000 unframed
Lonnie Holley 
Walk From the Haze, 2019
Collage on museum board with spray paint.
60 x 104 in
152.4 x 264.16 cm
$50,000 unframed
Dawoud Bey, Sydney Cain, Jonathan Calm, T. J. Dedeaux-Norris, Oliver Lee Jackson, Hung Liu, Vik Muniz, and Lewis Watts
FIGURAL EFFECTS

Rena Bransten Gallery is pleased to present Figural Effects, 8 works by 8 Artists. Long engaged with figurative traditions, the Gallery looks at representation and portraiture through the lens of authorship, authenticity, and history.  Each of these artists approaches storytelling in their own way, and on their own terms. T.J. Dedeaux-Norris uses various personas, performances and materials in a multi-iterative process. Dawoud Bey and Hung Liu have had decades long careers with their chosen mediums and a commitment to representing the present through communion with the past. Oliver Lee Jackson and Sydney Cain use spirituality, ancestry, and other worldly realms, while Calm turns the focus on himself and tracing the path of the Green Book.  Vik Muniz recreates then photographs iconic images using (in this case) postcards, looking at collective memory, perception, and ephemera.  Lewis Watts has found an interstitial concentration between street photography and formal portraiture – celebrating the moment with the subjects of his photographs.

All of these works are the artists’ singular representations of a deep investigation into racial, spiritual, and societal systems; the sheer creative force is the telling of the story.

Art Drop
Dan Miller

Our latest Art Drop is Dan Miller’s acrylic painting on paper. Click inquire to purchase. All proceeds benefit the artist and Creative Growth, this month’s institutional beneficiary.

 

Dan Miller’s artwork reflects his perceptions. Words and images are repeatedly overdrawn, creating ink layered masses that hover on the page to the point of obliteration and destruction of the ground. Each work contains the written recording of the artist’s obsession with objects like light bulbs, electrical sockets, food and the names of cities and people. Miller’s process transforms text into graphic elements, and employs an abstract visual language that is used as a tool for inquiry and expression.

Dan Miller
Untitled, 2017
Acrylic on paper
22 x 30 inches
55.9 x 76.2 cm
$6,000

Creative Growth

CREATIVE GROWTH ART CENTER is a non-profit based in Oakland, California that serves artists with disabilities by providing a professional studio environment for artistic development, gallery exhibition, and representation. Founded in 1974, Creative Growth is a leader in the field, establishing a model for a creative community guided by the principle that art is fundamental to human expression and that all people are entitled to its tools of communication.

Click HERE to learn more, and support Creative Growth.